Annual Telecaster Feature

The March 4 edition of Greasy Tracks spotlighted the Fender Telecaster, long recognized as one of the iconic instruments to make a profound impact in rock, soul, jazz, country and electric blues music.

Six-string innovator: Leo Fender never learned how to play the guitar, but his unique designs changed music forever.

Six-string innovator: Leo Fender never learned how to play the guitar, but his unique designs changed music forever.

Interviews with veteran Telecaster players Jim Weider, Larry Campbell and Tash Neal were featured as they provided insight on the guitar, players who’ve influenced them and some of their favorite songs where the Tele played a pivotal role.

Click here for Hour 1 and Hour 2 of the program and here for the playlist.

In what has become an annual rite, the trio of players brings their “Masters of the Telecaster” show to Infinity Hall in Norfolk on March 17.

Introduced by the innovative designer Leo Fender in 1950 and eventually branded the Telecaster in 1951, the revolutionary six string holds the distinction of being the first mass-produced, solid-body guitar — despite being possibly overshadowed in popularity by the Fender Stratocaster which made its debut in 1954.

Jim Weider will be joined by G.E. Smith and Danny Kortchmar in a tribute to Roy Buchanan on March 29.

Lifelong Tele Player: Jim Weider will be joined by Larry Campbell and Tash Neal at Infinity Hall in Norfolk on March 17.(Vernon Webb photo)

Over the years, the guitar gained great renown in in all musical genres and was the oft-preferred instrument of such legendary players as Jeff Beck, Michael Bloomfield, James Burton, Roy Buchanan, Eric Clapton, Albert Collins, Steve Cropper, Jesse Edwin Davis, Cornell Dupree, Danny Gatton, Merle Haggard, Mabon “Teenie” Hodges, Jimmy Johnson, Terry Kath, Buck Owens, Les Paul, Muddy Waters, Clarence White and Reggie Young to name but a few.

Weider, a life-long Telecaster player, joined The Band in 1985 and was the group’s sole guitarist until 1999 when the group broke up following the death of bassist Rick Danko. Weider would work closely with the Levon Helm Band as lead guitarist from 2009 until Helm’s death in 2012.

In addition to collaborating on designs produced by amplifier guru Mitch Colby, Weider works occasionally with some side projects — playing a variety of styles from Band covers in The Weight Band, to more improvisational forays with JIM WEIDER’S ProJECT PERCoLAToR and in the spirit of Helm’s diverse musical catalog with the Midnight Ramble Band.

Never Ending Tour: Larry Campbell (left) spent eight years as a touring guitarist with Bob Dylan (right).

Never Ending Tour: Larry Campbell (left) spent eight years as a touring guitarist with Bob Dylan (right).

A self-taught multi-instrumentalist, Campbell has become a go-to session player, producer and touring sideman, rising to prominence when he spent more than eight years on Bob Dylan’s “Never Ending Tour” which ran 1997-2004. He regularly worked with Weider over a seven-year period playing in Levon Helm’s “Midnight Rambles” series.

Campbell’s session work and production credits run the gamut from B.B. King, David Bromberg and The Black Crowes to Bob Dylan, Helm, Sheryl Crow and Willie Nelson.

Last Waltz Turns 40: Larry Campbell (left) and Jim Weider perform as part of 'The Last Waltz' 40th Anniversary Celebration in Damrosch Park at Lincoln Center in New York City on Aug. 6, 2016. (Ebet Roberts photo)

Last Waltz Turns 40: Larry Campbell (left) and Jim Weider perform as part of ‘The Last Waltz’ 40th Anniversary Celebration in Damrosch Park at Lincoln Center in New York City on Aug. 6, 2016. (Ebet Roberts photo)

In 2015, Campbell and his wife, Teresa Williams, released their first project together. The follow-up to the self-titled debut is slated to come out in June.

Campbell has won three Grammy Awards for his work as a producer, the first in 2007 for Levon Helm, Dirt Farmer, which was co-produced with Helm’s daughter, Amy. In 2009, Helm’s Electric Dirt, with Campbell producing, won a Grammy for Best Americana Album. Helm’s 2011 live release, Ramble at The Ryman, took a Grammy for Best Americana Album with Campbell rounding out his trio of Grammy honors for producing the live album.

Tash Neal is part of Brooklyn-based The London Souls, the group he and

Joining In: Tash Neal of The London Souls, who are currently working on their third album, rounds out The Masters of the Telecaster show. (Chad Anderson photo)

Joining In: Tash Neal of The London Souls, who are currently working on their third album, rounds out The Masters of the Telecaster lineup. (Chad Anderson photo)

drummer/vocalist Chris St. Hilaire co-founded in 2008 and are currently putting the wraps on their third studio album which is expected to be released later this year.

Now in its 22nd year, Greasy Tracks is the longest-running soul and blues program in the state and airs Saturday’s 3:30-5:30 p.m.

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