Jorma Kaukonen discusses new CD, Hot Tuna, JA and rich musical career

An interview with guitarist Jorma Kaukonen was featured on a special edition of Greasy Tracks spotlighting his career and marking the 50th anniversary of the Jefferson Airplane taking off.

Back to the roots: Jorma Kaukonen's new CD features a mix of blues, country and gospel stylings. (Scotty Hall photo)

Back to the roots: Jorma Kaukonen’s new CD features a mix of blues, country and gospel stylings. (Scotty Hall photo)

Renowned for his work with the Airplane and Hot Tuna, Kaukonen has returned to his roots on his just-released Ain’t In No Hurry (Red House), tapping into country, blues and gospel stylings with a mix of original compositions as well as interesting covers of tracks penned by the likes of A.P. Carter, Jimmy Cox, Yip Harburg, Thomas A. Dorsey and Woody Guthrie, many spotlighting his keen finger-picking ability.

To listen to the March 14 feature, here’s Hour 1 and Hour 2, the Kaukonen interview and the playlist.

The CD was produced by Larry Campbell — who plays guitar on a number of tracks — and features appearances by long-time collaborator bassist Jack Casady, mandolinist Barry Mitterhoff and singer Teresa Williams.

“You just can’t go backward,” said Kaukonen on the release of his latest project. “The arrow of time only goes in one direction. At this point in my life, perhaps I should be in more of a hurry, but for me it’s more important that each piece fits in the right place at the right time.”

Heavily influenced by Rev. Gary Davis, Kaukonen was drawn to the burgeoning blues, bluegrass and folk scenes of the early 1960s, especially in New York City where he saw such acts as Bill Monroe and The Foggy Mountain Boys, featuring Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs, performing in Greenwich Village.

Acoustic Tuna: Jack Casady (left), Jorma Kaukonen and Barry Mitterhoff perform at the Lobero Theatre In Santa Barbara, Calif. (L. Paul Mann photo)

Acoustic Tuna: Jack Casady (left), Jorma Kaukonen and Barry Mitterhoff perform at the Lobero Theatre In Santa Barbara, Calif. (L. Paul Mann photo)

Kaukonen eventually moved to California where he enrolled at the University of Santa Clara and fell in with a group of young musicians — Janis Joplin, Jerry Garcia, Paul Kantner, Ron “Pigpen” McKernan and Richmond “Steve” Talbott — many of whom would become household names, especially in the psychedelic rock and blues genre which blossomed in the later 1960s.

“Paul (Kantner) would introduce me to the gaggle of characters who would become Jefferson Airplane, Jack Casady would join us from D.C. and the rest truly became history,” Kaukonen said. “I owe that cast of luminous characters a huge debt of gratitude for starting my train rolling in such a momentous way.”

The Jefferson Airplane formed in 1965 and recorded its debut album, The Jefferson Airplane Takes Off in 1966 with a line-up — Kaukonen, Casady, Kantner (guitar/vocals), Marty Balin (vocals), Signe Toly Anderson (vocals) and Skip Spence (drums) — that would be the core of the band for its classic recordings.

Taking off: The Jefferson Airplane (from left) Signe Toly Anderson, Jack Casady, Marty Balin, Skip Spence, Paul Kantner and Jorma Kaukonen in 1966. (Chuck Boyd photo)

Taking off: The Jefferson Airplane (from left) Signe Toly Anderson, Jack Casady, Marty Balin, Skip Spence, Paul Kantner and Jorma Kaukonen in 1966. (Chuck Boyd photo)

By fall 1966, Great Society singer Grace Slick replaced Anderson and Spence was fired, only to emerge as a guitarist in Moby Grape which he helped form, opening the door for Spencer Dryden who took over on drums. What followed proved to be the best-known works in the Airplane canon: Surrealistic Pillow, After Bathing At Baxter’s, Crown of Creation and Volunteers as well as appearances at such legendary events as the debut Monterey Pop Festival in 1967; the inaugural Isle of White Festival where they headlined in 1968; and Woodstock in 1969.

In addition to his inimitable style of playing which became a trademark of the Airplane’s sound, Kaukonen contributed a number of stellar songs — many of which he still performs — including, “Embryonic Journey,” “Third Week In The Chelsea,” “Star Track” “Good Shepherd,” “Feel So Good” and “Trial By Fire.”

Hot Tuna emerged in early 1969 when Kaukonen, Casady, Kantner and drummer Joey Covington played a handful of dates when the Airplane took time off. There would be a handful of different line-ups in the early years of the band, sometimes just Kaukonen and Casady playing acoustic such as on their debut record, the self-titled 1970 release with tracks culled from a handful of shows recorded at a small Bay Area club with Will Scarlett joining on harp.

Electric marathons: Hot Tuna was known for playing lengthy electric sets with some  shows topping five hours. Bassist Jack Casady (left) drummer Bob Steeler and Jorma Kaukonen show in performance at the Palladium in New York City in 1976.

Electric marathons: Hot Tuna was known for playing lengthy electric sets with some shows topping five hours. Bassist Jack Casady (left), drummer Bob Steeler and Jorma Kaukonen in a 1976 performance at the Palladium in New York City.

Their first studio record, Burgers, came out in 1972 at which time the Airplane was as good as being grounded, effectively playing its final concerts that September. The group reluctantly reunited in 1989, releasing an album and undertaking a brief tour, highlighted by a mid-set Hot Tuna appearance during each show. In 1996, the Airplane was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Hot Tuna, be it in a scaled-down acoustic format or an electric line-up known for putting on marathon shows — some topping five hours in length — became the focal point for Kaukonen and Casady as they released a handful of studio and live albums in the 1970s.

Kaukonen’s Ain’t In No Hurry brings him full circle as he leans on the familiar, stripped down acoustic blues and folk styles.

“I never really thought about it when I was younger,” Kaukonen wrote in the liner notes, “but my choice of songs was always an effort to tell my story. Sometimes they were about things that happened and sometimes they were about things that never happened, sometimes they were about things that I wanted to happen, sometimes they were about things that I feared would happen… sometimes… there was always a sometimes. Learning to play guitar was the gift that enabled me to set the story to music.”

Greasy Tracks, which airs Saturdays 3:30-5:30 p.m., is the longest-running soul and blues show in Connecticut.

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